Christmas tree price inflates near holidays

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Photo by Olivia Signorile ’25

Christmas tree companies across the nation experience negative impacts due to the increased inflation and price of their trees.

Prices for Christmas trees have been predicted to rise by up to 10% this year as a result of rising manufacturing costs, limited supply of farm-grown trees and droughts. 

Agricultural inflation and the high cost of fuel and fertilizer have left many concerned with the inflated price of Christmas trees. 

“Inflation is leading to higher consumer costs — and agricultural inflation is particularly high,” People Magazine said. “In the last year, tree farm costs, including everything from raw materials to shipping, have increased.” 

Local Christmas tree farms have felt an impact  on their company during this holiday season. 

“Yes, our Christmas tree prices have gone up significantly,” Judi Shackett, Manager at Izzo & Sons Country Gardens in Westport, said. “We have very loyal customers, maybe a little but slower this year.” 

The drought that occurred during the summer is also having an effect on Christmas tree prices.

“The summer weather had an impact,  just more or less weather conditions,” Shackett said. 

We’re definitely seeing consumers go to the lower end of the spectrum. So buying less of the thousand dollar trees and buying more of the $200 trees. ”

— CEO of National Tree Chris Butler

Prices of Christmas trees are significantly increased due to the rise of inflation, droughts and lack of agricultural supplies.
(Photo by Olivia Signorile ’25)

The cost of Christmas trees varies across farms and stores, but during this holiday season, there has been an increase in people buying artificial trees.

Chris Butler, the CEO of National Tree, discussed the desire for fake trees as a result of high costs of authentic ones.

“We’re definitely seeing consumers go to the lower end of the spectrum. So buying less of the thousand dollar trees and buying more of the $200 trees,” Butler said in a statement from CBS News Miami.

While some people prefer having an artificial tree because they can reuse it every year and save money, others value having a real tree and the significance to it. 

“I prefer to get a real tree, although it is expensive and messy,” Katie Hannon ’25 said. “It’s the tradition and family bonding that makes real trees far better than fake trees.”