Developmental Wellness survey intends to provide intel into students’ well-being

Students+were+asked+a+series+of+questions+regarding+their+mental+health+during+the+pandemic+as+well+as+teacher-student+relationships.+The+goal+of+the+survey+was+to+help+students+with+their+well-being+in+the+school+environment.

Graphic by Maria Krug ’22

Students were asked a series of questions regarding their mental health during the pandemic as well as teacher-student relationships. The goal of the survey was to help students with their well-being in the school environment.

Maria Krug ’22, Paper Arts Editor

Staples students present in school April 28 through April 30 completed The Developmental Relationships Survey for Youth, a survey organized by the Search Institute with the intention of gathering information about the social and emotional well-being of students during the pandemic. 

AP Literature teacher Ann Neary was required to give all of her students the survey by Staples High School. 

“The town was interested in knowing how students are doing, so they made the survey anonymous to get real feedback,” Neary said. “Maybe it would change something that we do in order to help support students.”

Before taking the survey, students were assured that any information provided would be kept confidential. Students were also told that if any questions made them uncomfortable, they could skip the questions, or choose to stop taking the survey. 

The town was interested in knowing how students are doing, so they made the survey anonymous to get real feedback. Maybe it would change something that we do in order to help support students. ”

— Ann Neary

“This survey is NOT A TEST,” the survey said. “There are no right or wrong answers, just your experiences. Your responses will be kept PRIVATE — that means no one you know will see how you responded. Your name will NEVER be connected to the information you provide.”

By making the survey optional, the organization hoped that students would provide honest responses rather than completing it because it was mandatory.

“In my classes, all of my students took it,” Neary said. “Some finished it in 5 minutes, and some took their time.” 

Some students received parental approval to opt-out of the survey. However, many also decided to take it.

“I took it because I didn’t think much of it,” Mimi Schindler ’22 said. “I was fine with being completely anonymous and honest with it. I figured it would help someone out, so why not?”