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Westporters Remember Sept. 11 victims

Westporters Remember Sept. 11 victims
Blake Rubin

It was a beautiful but sorrowful evening at Sherwood Island. While the setting sun was falling over the horizon, the Connecticut community gathered together to pay respects to the ones lost during the horrific tragedy that occurred on Sept. 11, 2001.

As the ceremony began, every family in attendance was given a white rose along with a program. The program listed the names of those from Connecticut whose lives were taken on that day. The ceremony began promptly at  5:30 p.m.

“Today, we have come here to be united in our pain and our search for compassion and comfort,” said Daniel Esty, commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

What  followed was the introduction of members of the clergy, state officials and armed forces.

Shortly thereafter, speakers were invited to read the victims’ names. One by one, 160 names of those lost were recited.

“A special prayer for my own husband, Richard M. Kleane,” said Judy Kleane, completing the list of names.

Following the speakers was a moment of silence. As heads slowly lowered, mourners were given the chance to reflect on their loss and bring themselves closer to their loved ones. The silence was then broken by the U.S Coast Guard Cadet Glee club, who sang “American Tears.” As tears rolled down the cheeks of those who lost so much, they turned to the community for support.

While the choir was singing, two lines were formed as the attendees were directed towards the other grass with flowers in hand. This memorial was made out of stone which was located on the grass. Fighting back the tears, family members placed the roses by the names of those lost. After the last rose was placed, the stone memorial created a garden of white roses, which seemed to bring life to the beautiful ceremony.

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About the Contributor
Blake Rubin, Web A&E Editor
When asked what career she wants to pursue, Blake Rubin ’16 replied, “Doctor, definitely.” Not many high school students know exactly what career path they want to follow, but Rubin is confident in her choice. “I’ve always loved helping people and making [them] feel better,” Rubin continued. “I have a cousin who’s my role model, and she works in a hospital with trauma patients. She always talks [to me] about it.” Although Rubin does not want to specialize in trauma patients, her cousin’s career path inspired her to become a doctor. She is still deciding what type of doctor she aspires to be and is open to being anything from a dentist to a pediatrician. However she ruled out being a surgeon. “I can’t handle that,” she said with a laugh. Not only is Rubin passionate about her future career path, but she also has many other passions. Rubin has started her second year in Inklings and her first year as the web A&E editor. Her all time favorite story that she wrote covers teachers’ reactions to Yik Yak. “Letting other people read your work [is the best part about Inklings and] trying to collect all the interviews before [the] deadline is the hardest part,” reflected Rubin. This year in journalism she hopes to “increase [her] writing skills [and] focus more on writing new opinion pieces.” In addition to Inklings, Rubin does cross country running, Kool to Be Kind and Unified Sports.

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