Staples Players adapts to a new type of mask

Just as all other teams and clubs, Players must implement changes to their curriculum this fall.

Madeline Michalowski ’22

Just as all other teams and clubs, Players must implement changes to their curriculum this fall.

Madeline Michalowski '22 and Maria Krug '22 Web Opinions Editor

After a lengthy period of time spent trapped at home, the start of a new school year meant the chance for Staples students to return to a new type of normalcy. Many were thrilled with the reopening of school. Students finally got the chance to see friends and teachers and partake in clubs and extracurriculars. But for members of Staples Players, coming back meant no more in-person shows. 

Following the cancellation of the Spring production “Seussical,” Staples Players began adapting to new state requirements in preparation for a fall show. As an alternative, the famous Players shows are being converted into three radio shows. “The Wizard of Oz” on Sunday, Oct. 25, “Pride and Prejudice” on Sunday, Nov. 8 and “It’s a Wonderful Life” on Sunday, Nov. 22. 

“The way that we do rehearsals after school has changed a lot,” Samantha Webster ’21, a member of Players, said. “Everything is virtual with the exception of a few music rehearsals that we are having in person in the choir [room].” 

Obviously it will impact Players just because it’s not what we are all used to. It’s very different which doesn’t make it bad, but we are ready to make the most out of the situation.”

— Jordyn Goldshore ʼ21

In addition, beginner and advanced dance classes are being offered outside on the tennis courts with the use of masks. Workshops for the backstage crews are also taking place for members to learn new skills and become more familiar with the stage work.

Sasha Barnett ’22 is part of the head crews for hair and makeup as well as fundraising and outreach. She noted that there are many ways for Players to stay involved even with COVID-19 regulations.

 “[Workshops] are a great way to keep the involvement going even if you are not in a radio show,” Barnett ʼ22 said. 

These big changes can lead to lots of disappointment, but for Colin Konstanty ʼ22 simply being a part of the Players family is enough. 

“All that matters is that we are together,” he said. “I think a big part of Players is the friendships and just being able to see people and do a show with someone is so fun.”

Just like every other aspect of Staples, Players are adapting the best they can. 

“We have to support each other because we all are affected by this one way or another from sports to clubs,” Barnett said.  “I feel like the more we can do to help fellow classmates through these times is what’s important.”  

Jordyn Goldshore ʼ21 is part of the production crew and is optimistic about the changes. 

“Obviously it will impact Players just because it’s not what we are all used to,” she said. “It’s very different which doesn’t make it bad, but we are ready to make the most out of the situation.” 

Tickets to listen to the radio shows can be purchased through the Staples Players website. Upon purchase, customers will be provided with a link to tune in. According to Konstanty, the show must go on.

“I think it’s a great experience listening to the show on the radio,” he said, “and seeing the different ways that we are getting through this pandemic.”