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Freshmen reveal high school expectations versus realities

Blake Watkins ’26 (left) and Amere Miller ’27 (right) show Staples High School students that being friendly is the reality of being younger.
Photo by Nash Teran ’25
Blake Watkins ’26 (left) and Amere Miller ’27 (right) show Staples High School students that being friendly is the reality of being younger.

Ever remember what it was like going into your freshman year? For some, it could have been a couple of weeks ago, but for others, it could have been a couple of years ago. Sometimes, it makes you feel foolish to remember how nervous you were to start high school. Now, Staples High School is welcoming the class of 2027. With new students filling Staples for the 2023-24 school year, their nervous thoughts are coming along with them.

Typically, in cliche teen movies, high school is separated into groups: the jocks, nerds, cheerleaders, skaters, etc. We watch these films and allow them to influence our real life expectations. 

“I thought I was going to get bullied by the upperclassmen,” Jaxsyn Liebert ’27  said. 

Blake Watkins ’26 (left) and Amere Miller ’27 (right) demonstrate the expectation of getting bullied by an upper class student. (Photo by Nash Teran ’25)

As Liebert has settled into Staples he has found himself being able to get along with the older students, rather than getting beat up by them.

High school is also often portrayed as a more intense and demanding environment compared to middle school, causing freshmen to dwell on the nerve-racking aspects of this new school. 

High school is way better than middle school. It’s way bigger, the food is better and the teachers are better.

— Jace Darby ’27

“I was sort of expecting the honors classes to be much harder than described,” Nicole Wyszynski ’27 said. “The teachers at the middle school described them as so hard, but honestly they are much easier.” 

Another student agreed. 

“I thought the classes were going to be a lot harder in high school,” Autumn Kaye ’27 said. “But they have been pretty easy to catch up to and the teachers have been really good about making sure we know what we are doing.”

The class of ’27 is stepping into unfamiliar settings and habits. By forming an understanding of how freshmen anticipated their first year of high school, upperclassmen can warmly welcome them and make them feel comfortable, preparing them for their next four years.

“High school is way better than middle school,” Jace Darby ’27 said. “It’s way bigger, the food is better and the teachers are better.” 

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Danisha Nasution ’25, Staff Writer
Staff Writer Danisha Nasution ’25 thinks being in Inklings can open doors into helping people develop skills in all sorts of ways. “Personally, I want to use Inklings to eventually help me start my own blog,” Nasution said. “I have always wanted to start a blog, maybe Inklings can be the start of what’s to come.”  After Intro to Journalism caught her attention, she decided to take the step into Inklings. “I had really enjoyed reading everyone’s work on Inklings,” Nasution said. “It’s cool that now I am a part of it, I can project my voice in the newspaper.”

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