‘The App that Stole Christmas’ embodies importance of togetherness during holidays

The+film+is+a+product+of+Netflix%E2%80%99s+support+for+Black+Excellence%2C+particularly+in+the+arts%2C+as+the+entire+movie+was+written%2C+produced+and+directed+by+black+men+and+women.

Photo by Mishael Gill ’23

The film is a product of Netflix’s support for Black Excellence, particularly in the arts, as the entire movie was written, produced and directed by black men and women.

Mishael Gill ’23, Paper Sports Editor

The App that Stole Christmas is a Netflix film that was released on Nov. 20. Starring Ray J (as Felix Rhome), Elise Neal (as Carly) and Jalyn Hall (as Ben Rhome), the story explores the principle of holiday spirit amidst a society driven by technology. 

Felix Rhome is the CEO of a successful tech business known as Bomazon. The company sells an app that simplifies holiday shopping by allowing users to order and ship presents with the click of a button. 

Living a life of luxury with his family, Rhome feels accomplished. However, he comes to realize that his app is actually diminishing the togetherness that the holiday season is meant to foster by making people overly absorbed in technology while neglecting their relationships with others. 

Rhome himself quickly notices his relationship with his wife (Elise Neal), son (Jalyn Hall) and father (Miguel A. Nunez Jr.) deteriorating due to his dominating occupation with the development of his app.

As the story progresses, Rhome embarks on an adventure that leads him to realize the adverse effect of his invention and ultimately recognize that goodness is characterized by togetherness and the time we spend with one another. 

After taking a fall to the head and the end of a long workday, he falls unconscious and wakes up in Santa’s workshop where he is employed by Santa (J. Anthony Brown) and JayQ (JayQ) to help craft toys for Christmas.

The film depicts JayQ as a friendly yet strict companion who helps Rhome come to terms with his success versus his family and the sudden realization that his own app is undermining the spirit of the holidays.

The movie does a brilliant job of intertwining Rhome’s childhood experiences crafting toys with his father (which he revisits during his job as one of Santa’s workers) to his eventual reconciliation with his father. He is humbled by the experience which is a sharp contrast to his life as a millionaire.

In a time where we are especially dependent on the internet, “The App that Stole Christmas” takes an interesting angle on the holidays and reiterates the importance of family and love despite the distractions of our hectic lives.”

— Mishael Gill ’23

In a time where we are especially dependent on the internet, “The App that Stole Christmas” takes an interesting angle on the holidays and reiterates the importance of family and love despite the distractions of our hectic lives. 

Even as someone who does not celebrate the holidays, the movie was engaging and wholesome nonetheless and I found myself drawn into the progression of the plot. The message of the film and the relationships between the characters harmonized in a manner that was very relevant to today’s generation.

Although the film is quite short, measuring in at only one hour and three minutes, it conveys a powerful message about gratitude in our technologic-dependent lives and applies to all viewers. If you’re looking for a charming Christmas movie with a modern twist, this is an ideal choice. I give “The App that Stole Christmas” a 7/10.