‘Ad Astra’ misses star quality, burns out

This+is+a+photo+of+stars+forming%2C+taken+by+Nasa%E2%80%99s+Hubble+telescope+on+the+25th+anniversary+of+its+launch+in+1990.+The+Hubble+telescope+can+see+about+10-15+billion+light+years+away+and+is+expected+to+be+replaced+in+March+of+2021.+Hubble+has+discovered+10+times+more+galaxies+than+NASA+thought+even+existed+in+its+time+up+in+space.
Back to Article
Back to Article

‘Ad Astra’ misses star quality, burns out

This is a photo of stars forming, taken by Nasa’s Hubble telescope on the 25th anniversary of its launch in 1990. The Hubble telescope can see about 10-15 billion light years away and is expected to be replaced in March of 2021. Hubble has discovered 10 times more galaxies than NASA thought even existed in its time up in space.

This is a photo of stars forming, taken by Nasa’s Hubble telescope on the 25th anniversary of its launch in 1990. The Hubble telescope can see about 10-15 billion light years away and is expected to be replaced in March of 2021. Hubble has discovered 10 times more galaxies than NASA thought even existed in its time up in space.

Photo contributed by Christopher Crockett

This is a photo of stars forming, taken by Nasa’s Hubble telescope on the 25th anniversary of its launch in 1990. The Hubble telescope can see about 10-15 billion light years away and is expected to be replaced in March of 2021. Hubble has discovered 10 times more galaxies than NASA thought even existed in its time up in space.

Photo contributed by Christopher Crockett

Photo contributed by Christopher Crockett

This is a photo of stars forming, taken by Nasa’s Hubble telescope on the 25th anniversary of its launch in 1990. The Hubble telescope can see about 10-15 billion light years away and is expected to be replaced in March of 2021. Hubble has discovered 10 times more galaxies than NASA thought even existed in its time up in space.

Christopher Tatusko ’22

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“Ad Astra” is quite possibly the biggest waste of time that I have probably ever seen.
The movie is about Roy McBride (Brad Pitt) who is on a mission to Neptune. He is on a search for his father and his father’s crew that went missing in space 30 years prior due to an unidentified power surge which now threatens the fate of the universe.
The movie does do a few things well, such as showing the audience how astronauts are psychologically affected by their time in space. The way that the director sets up the scenes lets the audience feel immersed and they can picture themselves like they are there. Also the acting was quite good. Brad Pitt was phenomenal in his role. But that’s where the good qualities end.
The movie could have had more action. It was a little dull for a sci-fi adventure movie. One scene that I found to be pretty boring is the rocket launch scene. They could have added more suspense and made it more dramatic to symbolize the launch’s importance.
Overall, it think the movie as a whole is not worth it if you want to see an action packed space adventure movie but, if you just want to see it to say that you saw it be my guest. This movie is not complete garbage and has some redeeming qualities as a critic I have to give this movie a star rating so I would give it 3.5 out of 5 stars.
Movie Tickets and Times: https://www.fandango.com/ad-astra-219166/movie-overview
Movie Trailers: https://www.fandango.com/movie-trailer/adastra-trailer/219166

Print Friendly, PDF & Email