New School, New Spirit?

New School, New Spirit?

Eliza Llewellyn ’14
Staff Writer

Katie Glick '13 (left) and Lily Rappaport '13 (right) dressed up for the spirit days despite the fact they're underclassmen| Photo courtesy of Courtney Babbin '13

For one week, superheroes, flappers, fairies and black cats roam the halls of Staples. Many choose to participate in the tradition of spirit week, sporting a themed costume for each day of the week. However, it seems that freshmen and sophomores are not as eager to participate in spirit week as upperclassmen.

Throughout the week, most of the elaborate and daring costumes were worn by older students, while few freshmen and sophomores went to the extreme with their outfits.

Underclassmen’s lackluster costumes may be attributed to intimidation. “As a freshman, I thought mostly seniors participated in spirit days,” Caroline Prangley ’13 said. “I was too scared [to participate].”

With the school year still in the first quarter, the newness of Staples may be responsible for freshman hesitation to participate in spirit week. Fresh out of middle school, this longtime Staples tradition is unfamiliar to ninth graders. Melissa Mann ’14, declined to participate in Spirit Week so far.

“I didn’t want to be the awkward one in the hallway, the only one who dressed up,” she said. In a new school, freshmen may not know how widely students participate.

However, some underclassmen cite laziness or lack of time as reasons to skip spirit days. Sleep deprivation is a widespread reason to bypass breaking out the cape or costume. But with pajama/college apparel day, even the half asleep can take part. “I’m going all out [for pajama day],” Mann said.

Although it may appear that participation in spirit days is dissipating, many students expressed positive feelings for the tradition, as it creates a feeling of school unity. The spirit days connect students, regardless of grade or social circle. “They show that everyone is a part of the school,” Brianna Reedy ’13 said.