Federal lawsuit calls attention to Connecticut gun legislations

Gun+legislations+became+a+hot+topic+in+Connecticut+as+regulatory+laws+have+been+tried+in+federal+court.

Graphic by Lily Klau '23

Gun legislations became a hot topic in Connecticut as regulatory laws have been tried in federal court.

Three gun owners, the Connecticut Citizens Defense League and the Second Amendment Foundation attempted to overturn the Connecticut Assault Weapons Ban by filing a federal lawsuit on Sept. 29.

The Connecticut Assault Weapons Ban was passed in 2013 in response to the murder of 26 people at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut in 2012. According to ctpublic.org, this law bans more than 150 models of semi-automatic rifles from state grounds, requires a person to have a permit when purchasing a firearm or ammunition and includes a universal background check with a registry of previous convicts. 

According to nbcconnecticut.com, “[The plaintiffs] say Connecticut’s gun laws violate Second Amendment gun rights as well as 14th Amendment due process rights.”

[Connecticut] will vigorously defend these common sense laws that are seeking to reduce violent crime and mass shootings. When it comes to the safety of the people of our state, we must stand up and do what is right.”

— Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont

President of the Connecticut Citizens Defense League Holly Sullivan said in a statement that everyone deserves to live in a secure nation, but banning the ownership of the most commonly owned weapons in the country is not the way to do so.

In response, many local community members are concerned with the thought of gun regulations relaxing in Connecticut. Social studies teacher at Staples High School Nell-Ayn Lynch reflects on what this might mean for her and her students. 

“I guess my question would be why? What purpose is it going to serve to them to overturn something like that,” Lynch said. “I think it’s just disrespectful. It’s disrespectful to families, to children, to teachers; I just think it would be the wrong move.” 

Despite these attempts, Connecticut has chosen to stand by the legislation following Sandy Hook. According to ct.gov, Connecticut “‘will vigorously defend these common sense laws that are seeking to reduce violent crime and mass shootings,’” Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont said. “‘When it comes to the safety of the people of our state, we must stand up and do what is right.’”