Gaggle gone viral

Bella Gollomp, Staff Writer

Just when Staples students thought the harassment had come to an end, they were faced with yet another demoralizing app: Gaggle. Within 24 hours, the administration had blocked the app, but students found they were able to access it outside the school’s network.

The app is described on iTunes as, “An anonymous local bulletin board to post messages to the people around you. It is a fast reliable way to share your thoughts, gossip and talk about things around you.”

Essentially, it is the equivalent of Yik Yak, just with images instead of text.

“What we have created here, ironically, is a public toilet stall on the internet for everybody to see,” Principal John Dodig said. “it’s anonymous, and you can be as gross as you want.”

The app shortly made its way to Staples after the recent fiasco with Yik Yak. Many students say they downloaded Gaggle as soon as they heard about the photo usage.

“It’s a pretty active site, believe it or not,” said an anonymous junior boy. “It’s mainly juniors who have been posting pictures of people hooking up, drunk, and passed out in hopes that others will find them humorous.”

Despite the negative attention that Yik Yak had drawn upon Staples, some students simply were not phased and continue to participate on Gaggle.

The administration learned of the app yesterday and were able by today to shut it down on school grounds, according to Dodig; however, those who have 3G or 4G cell phones still have access to the site.

Alexa Davis ‘15 said that the presence of images worsens the damage on the victims, “Unlike Yik Yak where people can make up lies, Gaggle allows you to upload photos that you have saved to your phone which is basically visual confirmation, not to mention an invasion of privacy.”

After the events that occurred within the past week, Dodig has encouraged his staff to continue to make Staples a safe learning environment for its students and to report anything that they witness.

“If this was just a job and I didn’t care for the students here as my own children, I would go home and forget about it, but I can’t,” Dodig said. “It is the same idea as if my son or daughter let me down. I’m disappointed to say the least.”