Connecticut vaccination rates decline, worries officials

Connecticut+remains+effective+in+vaccine+distribution%3B+however%2C+demand+has+decreased+in+the+past+few+weeks%2C+leaving+officials+concerned.

Graphic by Ella Shi '23

Connecticut remains effective in vaccine distribution; however, demand has decreased in the past few weeks, leaving officials concerned.

Ella Shi ’23, Paper Features Editor

In recent weeks, Connecticut’s vaccination rates have seen a drastic decrease, despite remaining a forerunning state in terms of vaccine distribution. Officials are concerned about persuading wary residents into receiving the vaccine, now that most of those who are eager to get the vaccine have done so. 

According to The Courant, the vaccination rate during the first week of May was less than half of the rate during the first week of April, when eligibility opened up for residents 16 and up. 

“I feel like it’s important that everyone encourages vaccination,” Zoe Simonte ’23 said. “There’s a lot of false information that is being spread that makes people not want to get it.”

As 60.3% of Connecticut residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, officials theorize that greater persuasion will be needed to push the remaining unvaccinated residents who continue to remain unsure, to get their vaccines.

I feel like it’s important that everyone encourages vaccination. There’s a lot of false information that is being spread that makes people not want to get it.”

— Zoe Simonte ’23

“We always anticipated … as we get to a younger demographic, the so-called invincibles, it was going to take a lot more persuasion,” Governor Ned Lamont said in a press release on May 6. “We also realized that when we got 60%, 70% of even the folks over 45% vaccinated, that final 30% was going to be tougher.”

However, with newer eligibility openings for ages 12 through 15, an influx of vaccine demand will be seen in the next few weeks. Yet, Lamont emphasizes that those who still remain unvaccinated should strongly consider getting the vaccine.

“It doesn’t work unless we all get vaccinated,” Lamont said.

Despite the recent decline, Connecticut remains a forerunner in vaccine distribution, placing second in the percentage of fully vaccinated residents.