Seniors changing Facebook names

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Seniors changing Facebook names

Ivy Prince, Staff Writer

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Senior year is known as the best year in high school. You get senior privileges, like parking on campus, being the oldest and most “mature” kids at the school, and the time to change your Facebook name has finally arrived.

Seniors at Staples High School have the tradition to change their normal Facebook name, to a play on their real name. For Claire Saracena ’15, she used ‘Sarah Cena’, and Kaela O’kelly ’15 changed hers to ‘PB O’Jelly.’

Logan Murphy ’15 has always been looking forward to her senior year and she couldn’t be happier that it’s here. The time to change her name has finally arrived.

“People come up with senior names by playing around with their names trying to think of words or phrases that sound like their first or last names,” Murphy said. “Because people always call me log like the piece of wood, I decided to make my name ‘Pile of Logs’.”

Mackenzie Wood ’17 and her friends cannot wait until next year. “I’ve been looking forward to my senior year since my first day of high school. All the privileges and activities you get to do look so fun,” Wood says.

Even though it’s not their time to change their Facebook names, many girls start thinking about the name they will choose, a year in advance, or even earlier, “For me, I’ve already thought about some names I could use. It’s fun for me to think of ideas for myself and for my friends,” Wood said.

Nothing says senior year like a name change on Facebook for Mikaela Dedona ’15. “It’s all about of the tradition,” Dedona said. “I feel like now people change them just because of the tradition, and not to protect themselves. I don’t think any of my friends did it because of colleges, mostly just for fun.”

Although this trend for some meant to protect them from letting colleges find their Facebook page or other social media, it is mostly more of a fun and goofy tradition, that many underclassmen hope will continue on.

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