Students trade beaches for bosses

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Students trade beaches for bosses

Grant Sirlin, Staff Writer

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Whether it’s taking a four week vacation in the Caribbean, conquering the Himalayas, or hopping across the country in pursuit of a college, the Staples student body utilizes its summer jailbreak in just about every way possible.

Although many students erase the word “schoolwork” from their vocabulary as soon as they escape from Staples’s doors, the final bell marks the beginning of a different sort of work for many teenagers: summer jobs.

As a sun-lover, Evan Gilland ’16 plans to spend his summer working as a counselor at a Westport beach camp. He can’t wait to goof around with jumpy, sugar-addicted 9-year olds and feels that he can gain valuable work experience through his job. “Plus, I need money for gas,” he said.

Besides earning some pocket cash, Staples students spend their summer working for more than a handful of reasons.

As an intern for a magazine, Zac Polin ’14 appreciates his opportunity to work with “entertaining and outgoing people.” However, he also feels that the job’s 9 am to 1 pm hours allow for the perfect balance of work and relaxation on the beach.

While being a camp counselor or a lifeguard may seem to be the most popular summer jobs, perfecting a froyo swirl and taking care of children have had increasing popularity at Staples.

Summer babysitter Maya Lawande ’16 believes that her job is the absolute best. “We play basketball, have epic water balloon fights, and they love to play on their dad’s drums,” she said. “It’s more of just hanging out with younger kids rather than being in charge of them like some people might think.”

But more than all other benefits that come from from summer work, Gilland feels that one’s future should be the biggest propellent.

“Having a summer job is something I feel most teenagers should have because it will help them in their transitions towards adulthood,” Gilland said. “Everyone will have a job one day, and it’s best to experience one while you’re young.”

 

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