Infinite love fills the big screen (and there’s no fault in that)

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Infinite love fills the big screen (and there’s no fault in that)

Andrea Frost, Breaking News Managing Editor

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Augustus Waters has over 55,000 followers on Twitter. By January 2013,  one million copies of  “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green had been printed and sold. Time Magazine named it the number one fiction book of the year.

To say that this book has skyrocketed in popularity would be an understatement.

And with a trailer that has over 17 million views on Youtube, the movie will be no exception.

The heart-warming yet heart-wrenching story told in “The Fault in Our Stars” follows a 16-year-old cancer patient named Hazel as she falls in love with Augustus Waters, a boy she meets at support group.

“I remember the day I got the book. I sat and read it in one sitting,” Annabelle Porio ’15 said. “I just loved the authenticity of the characters and how John Green managed to make such a sad topic both heartwarming and still funny at times,”

On June sixth, the words that fill the pages of “The Fault in Our Stars” will be turned into a motion picture. The hype for this movie is nothing but huge as eyes are eager to watch this love story unravel.

“I cannot wait to see how they portray the characters and the plot on the big screen,” Noa Wind ’15 said. “I really hope they don’t change a lot and they keep it consistent with the novel; it’s perfect as it is.”

With popular books in the past, such as “Harry Potter” and “The Hunger Games,” die-hard fans have been disappointed as the movies have not only strayed from the book, but also haven’t lived up to them.

Amanda Morgan, an English teacher, thinks that this movie will probably not do the book justice because part of what makes the novel so wonderful is Hazel’s written voice.

“The book appealed to me because it’s emotionally engaging and funny without being dumbed down or superficial,” she said. “It’s littered with complex literary allusions and John Green’s cleverness [creates] the joy and raw emotion of the novel.”

However, Porio is not too worried about the movie skewing from the writing because John Green himself is screenwriting it. She trusts Green to stay faithful to the book and his readers.

Like many others, Porio and Wind are restless for this movie to premiere: they are looking forward to smiling and laughing and crying at the infinite love on the movie screen.

“If there’s a midnight premier, you better believe I’m going to it,” Wind said. “But, I will need to go with someone who has a readily available shoulder to cry [okay?].”

Okay.