“I Love Boobies” Bracelets Draw Attention


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Sam Bortniker’11

“I Love Boobies” bracelet|Photo by Danielle Frost '13

Web A&E Editor

Pushing the limit of appropriateness are the new “I Love Boobies” bracelets students have been fashioning.  They are part of The Keep A Breast Foundation’s nationwide campaign to spread awareness to a younger audience.

“Yes they are silly and immature but they still support a good cause,” Scott Feder’11 said. While the bracelet’s slogan remains controversial their purpose seems to be for a genuine cause.

Rachel Diamond’11 said that while not every student knows that the bracelets are for Keep A Breast Foundation, the organization is still successful by advertising the issue and fundraising for education, treatment, and prevention programs.

The money from purchases of the “I Love Boobies” bracelets are directly donated to support breast cancer. Although The Keep A Breast Foundation’s mission is to spread awareness and raise funds, the slogan “I Love Boobies” may not be the most appropriate strategy.

“It’s disappointing that we have to resort to titillation in order to make a statement, support a cause, and make money,” said Principal Dodig. Although, shocked that the organization would advertise with such a phrase, Dodig accepted the fact it is for a good cause and does indeed draw attention.

Dodig said that he considers this slogan somewhat demeaning to women, and if any students had created this slogan it would certainly not be accepted in Staples. But because “I Love Boobies” is backed by an organization, and is a nationwide campaign, it is a little more acceptable.

Apparently, the excuse, ‘it’s for breast cancer’ has convinced teachers that “I love Boobies” written on a bracelet, is acceptable to wear to school. Feder said that in the beginning he received weird looks from teachers, but a simple explanation got their approval.

Zoe Heller’11 and Feder, both summer camp counselors, said they wore their bracelets to camp everyday and had no problem among their elementary school campers. Feder even bought his campers bracelets. If elementary school children can take “I Love Boobies” bracelets seriously, Staples can certainly handle them.

“It’s not a fashion statement. It provokes a question,” Heller said. The cause is strong enough that question of appropriateness can be swept aside.

The simple truth is, The Keep a Breast Foundation is successful in their “I Love Boobies” campaign.

Students buying the bracelets for themselves donate money while drawing attention of others. While there may be a more respectful approach, keep in mind the organization is advertising towards the younger crowd. “I don’t think it’s the best way to do it – but it’s a way,” Will Cohn’13 said.

“When people look at them their obviously like, “boobies on a bracelet?!” But it raises awareness because it’s so out there,” Olivia Hammer’12 said. The bracelet definitely draws attention of students and teachers. The “I Love Boobies” bracelets support cancer; because they are for a good cause, the bracelets remain appropriate for school. Especially now, with October being Breast Cancer Awareness month it is especially important that awareness is spread – the intentions of the “I Love Boobies” bracelets.

The Keep A Breast Foundation

http://www.keep-a-breast.org/

You can purchase the bracelets for about $3.99 at http://www.loserkids.com/category-exec/category_id/1221 or

http://www.zumiez.com/brands/keep-a-breast/keep-a-breast-foundation-i-heart-boobies-bracelet-1.html

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