A Successful Opening Night

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Back to Article

A Successful Opening Night

Graphic made by Nicole DeBlasi; Photo taken by Kerry Long

Graphic made by Nicole DeBlasi; Photo taken by Kerry Long

Graphic made by Nicole DeBlasi; Photo taken by Kerry Long

Nicole DeBlasi, Web A&E Editor

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On Thursday, May 30, Staples Players premiered the classic play You Can’t Take It With You, a comedy about family.

You Can’t Take It With You showcases the Sycamores- one odd family. The mother, Penny, writes plays and their daughter, Essie, will start dancing at any time when her husband, Ed Carmichael, starts playing the xylophone.

Alice Sycamore, the one “normal” person in her family, has a fiance, Tony Kirby, who brings his parents to meet the Sycamores on the wrong night, leading to one very awkward evening.

Isabel Perry ’15, a student-director for the play, believes this is one of the best plays Staples Players has done.

“The show is hilarious and timeless. I laugh every time, and the acting is superb,” Perry said.

The audience agreed.

Lauren Weinberger ’13, a member of Players, loved the show.

“I thought it was great,” Weinberger said. “Being in Players, I know how hard it is to work on and produce a show, and I thought it was a great opening night.”

Jake Landau ’13, who went to go see the play, echoed Weinberger.

“I mean, it’s a classic play and they perform it so well,” Landau said.

One aspect that made this play so good was where it was performed: the Black Box. The Black Box gave the play a more intimate feel by making the audience feel like they were really a part of the play.

“The front row seats are about three feet from the edge of the stage,” Perry said. “You’re really right up there with the actors and can see every movement and emotion.”

Weinberger enjoyed this change in venue.

“I [loved] it in the Black Box,” Weinberger said. “You feel the energy of the actors.”

The actors in Players did an awesome job in making audience members laugh until their stomach hurt and accomplished bringing this classic play to life.

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