Modern Valentine’s Day promotes financial interpretation of love

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Graphic by Grace Livecchi '21

Corporate Valentine’s Day is a moneysucker that we must not feed into.

Grace Livecchi ’21, Social Media Director

Valentine’s Day is a commerce-driven holiday, where the celebration of love is second to how much money you have to spend to prove it. My father, a noble man known for his hatred of unnecessary spending, says it is just another holiday that lets us lose touch of reality. Boy, is he right. 

Romance in 2021 takes the shape of a $15 pop-up Papyrus card singing “L.O.V.E” by Frank Sinatra. And although I joke, things like this are the reason why people are less creative nowadays (because they know they can always rely on their good ol’ buddy Frank.) Secondly, they are utterly meaningless and only proves you have $15 to spare. Because if you were actually thoughtful, you would do more than the absolute bare minimum, and it wouldn’t have to cost a dime. For example, you can make your partner a playlist of the songs that remind you of them. Additionally, you could prepare them a heartfelt dinner using your book of fancy recipes that was collecting dust.

[Y]ou can make your partner a playlist of the songs that remind you of them. Additionally, you could prepare them a heartfelt dinner using your book of fancy recipes that was collecting dust.”

 I swear, America will find a way to commercialize anything. Just take Christmas, for instance. Built upon ideals of charity, family and well-being, Christmas has taken a flashy, moneysucking turn for the worse in the modern era. But at least with Christmas, the norm of self expression for your loved ones is conveyed beyond a box of low quality chocolates or those giant teddy bears that are weirdly expensive. 

Don’t even get me started on how most of the franchise behind Valentine’s Day is just a total stretch, like how candy has become popularized for the holiday “because you’re sweet.” Give me a break. Do you know what isn’t sweet? The millions of dollars Americans spend on candy that will most likely sit at the highest shelf of their cabinets year round.

 Corporate Valentine’s day has gone further than its intended audience: it’s an invasive species that is evolving. Every year, my mother gets me a pink-hued gimmick and some Lindor chocolates on Feb. 14. Instead of being a day meant for honoring the love you have for your honey, Valentine’s Day, in essence, has become a monochromatic Christmas. Mom, if you’re reading this, I love you, but you’re part of the problem. 

Maybe this is all just a consequence of capitalism. After coming home from their nine to five shifts, Americans just want something to look forward to, something to dumb them down, something that is totally and completely meaningless. In that case, Valentine’s Day provides just that. Don’t get me wrong, even this cynic likes a surprise from a special someone on Feb. 14. I’m just saying, you don’t have to go into your wallet and spend some hard cold cash to let someone know how much you love them.