Internet usage escalates due to Covid-19

+Chart+shows+the+change+in+internet+usage+since+the+virus+outbreak+in+Websites+and+Apps.%0A

Photo contributed by flowingdata.com

Chart shows the change in internet usage since the virus outbreak in Websites and Apps.

Maria Krug '22, Web Opinions Editor

No traveling, no restaurants, no movie theaters and no school. COVID-19 has impacted so many lives around the world, as well as daily routines. Because people are stuck at home with not much to do, boredom and stir-craziness have caused people to spend more time online than ever. 

 An increase in internet usage is almost inevitable during quarantine. People are more likely to spend their time online when stuck at home for hours upon hours than partake in other activities. Whether it is through the use of a phone, a computer or television, people are plugged in, trying to find a new way to entertain themselves. 

“While not technically considered an addiction, excessive attachment to the Internet is becoming more commonplace and problematic,” Greatist reports. 

Though this current generation has been a bit obsessed with technology and the internet for a while now, it’s during this pandemic where change is needed.

According to  Piedmont Healthcare, too much screen time can increase or lead to anxiety, whether it’s from reading negative news to believing false information posted online. Due to the fact that most people now have even more free time and availability, they are spending even more time online and anxiety levels can increase even more. 

Not only does social media usage increase anxiety, but it increases stress levels as well. 

“Stress might come from maintaining a large network of Facebook friends, feeling jealous of their well-documented and well-appointed lives, the demands of replying to text messages, the addictive allure of photos,” according to Pew Research Center

Though there is no way of getting thousands of people to stop using the internet altogether, there are other ways to spend time while quarantined. For example, reading books, organizing, discovering a new hobby or painting. All of these activities do not include the use of the internet and are great ways to spend time while at home. 

“It’s better for your mind, body, and spirit to allow breaks from the many devices we have,’ Adventist Health suggests.  “If you put some realistic goals in place and couple that with a few small habit changes, you might find that reducing technology use and unplugging throughout the day can create a healthier and happier lifestyle.”