College names don’t define who you are

Frank Bruni explains how twisted the college admissions process has become. Between test prep, tutors and a whole lot of anxiety, Bruni offers a different view on a subject that has swept America.

Photo contributed by Amazon.com

Frank Bruni explains how twisted the college admissions process has become. Between test prep, tutors and a whole lot of anxiety, Bruni offers a different view on a subject that has swept America.

Emma Van Riper ’20, Social Media Director

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As I start my senior year, I figured I’m bound to be asked by various people where I want to go to school next year. However, I didn’t figure that every parent of my friends, every doctor, every dentist or any adult I talked to would bring up college. It’s even worse with kids in my own grade, as the competition is exploding from every angle possible.

My peers are stressing out about the college admissions process just as I am, but I’ve tried to go into it all with a relaxed mindset. You really can’t control where you are and aren’t going to get into. So, I figured that I did my best in high school, and whatever happens with the admissions process is out of my hands.

A book called “Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania” offers a similar view on the stress behind admissions. Frank Bruni shows how successful people come from different colleges and backgrounds, explaining that it’s important for kids to make the most of their college experience by utilizing opportunities both inside and outside of the classroom.

So many people are obsessed with where you go and which “big-name” schools you apply to, but I’ve realized what’s actually important is what you do once you’re at the school. Balancing schoolwork and social life, taking advantage of all the opportunities offered to you and networking to make connections to use in the future is essential, no matter where you go to school.

So many people are obsessed with where you go and which “big-name” schools you apply to, but I’ve realized what’s actually important is what you do once you’re at the school.”

— Emma Van Riper '20

Although prestigious Ivy leagues do look impressive, the rest of us not going to those schools can be just as successful. It’s important to find a school that fits what you’re looking for, and you should be able to see yourself there. For those who don’t have a first choice in mind, you can apply to some schools that have what you’re looking for, and choose from your acceptances.

It’s useless to stress over things that are out of your control, and at this point, our previous grades are what they are. As I submit my applications in the upcoming weeks, I just hope I end up someplace that I enjoy going to. My plan is to just hope for the best, and see where the road takes me. 

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