Connecticut COVID-19 cases rise in wake of phase three reopening

On+Monday%2C+Oct.+12%2C+1%2C+339+COVID-19+cases+were+reported%2C+brining+the+positivity+rate+up+to+2.4%25.+The+is+the+highest+rate+Connecticut+has+seen+since+June.+

Graphic by Meg Enquist '23

On Monday, Oct. 12, 1, 339 COVID-19 cases were reported, brining the positivity rate up to 2.4%. The is the highest rate Connecticut has seen since June.

Meg Enquist '23, Staff Writer

Connecticut reported a 2.4% COVID-19 positivity rate on Monday Oct. 12, the highest single-day rate since June. 

The number of COVID-19 related hospitalizations increased by 16 patients, bringing the statewide total to 188. Connecticut hasn’t had this many COVID-19 hospitalizations since June 15. 

This recent uptick followed Connecticut’s positivity rates remaining around 1% throughout the summer and the beginning of fall.

When you see the positivity rate going from less than 1% to 1, 1.5, now 2.4, it’s not unexpected, but it’s incredibly unnerving and a little exhausting,” Lamont said. 

The third phase of reopening began on Thursday, Oct. 8. This phase allowed an increased capacity for restaurants, indoor and outdoor gatherings and entertainment venues, barber shops, hair salons, libraries and places of worship. 

“I don’t think they should have started phase three so soon because with increased capacity there would be a higher chance of more people being exposed to the virus.””

— Ava Harvey '23

The decision to enter phase three has been controversial given the rising number of COVID-19 cases in Connecticut. 

“I don’t think they should have started phase three so soon because with increased capacity there would be a higher chance of more people being exposed to the virus,” Ava Harvey ’23 said. 

As a result of COVID-19 cases rising in Connecticut, Lamont made an executive order

allowing local leaders to revert to the phase two capacity restrictions if the town has 15 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents during a two week rolling average. This order took effect on Thursday, Oct. 15.  

Dr. Albert Ko, a professor at the Yale School of Public Health, believes that these upticks will continue to happen throughout the fall and winter, but wouldn’t result in another lockdown. 

“I expect them to be more bushfires than they are going to be wildfires,” Ko said.