Administration Takes Down Cheerleader Breast Cancer Posters

Administration+Takes+Down+Cheerleader+Breast+Cancer+Posters

Staples administration took down posters made by the cheerleaders as part of the “Pink Out,” a football game whose proceeds go towards breast cancer prevention. The posters were taken down from the cafeteria due to what the administration deemed inappropriate content.

Each week, the cheerleaders create motivational posters for the football team, but these were different.

“H saves the A B C and D’s,” “Brian is the breast of the breast,” and “Joey wins to save the twins” were some of the slogans.

“We don’t want to make a mockery of the situation and those comments were making a mockery of them….there are a lot of people who have been affected [by breast cancer] and they can be taken as offensive,” said Assistant Principal Karyn Morgan.

The cheerleaders stayed up late making the posters as they do before every football game and were surprised during the first lunch wave to see the posters being removed as they did not view them as offensive.

“They ripped mine by accident when they were taking it down and it took me two hours to make. I’m not mad about them taking the posters down, but for the amount of time and effort I put into the poster, it’s not fair to me for it to just be torn off the windows,” said cheerleader Maddy Mann ’13.

Fellow cheerleader Alexa Casimir ’13 expressed her frustration with the reason the administrators gave for the removal of the posters. According to Casimir, the team was told their posters were taken down because they had failed to get them approved by the assistant principals’ office, which Casimir says the team has never done before.

With regards to the vulgarity of the posters, Casimir says, “The game is about breast cancer and the posters are a way to make light humor of a very serious subject. It’s not vulgar.”

Kara Yass, the mother of a senior football player and junior cheerleader, was at school during the lunch wave today selling logowear for the Pink Out. “I think that the posters were witty and clever and that any publicity for breast cancer awareness is good publicity,” said Yass.

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