The h15tory of the senior girls’ shirts

Becky Hoving, Staff Writer

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For as long as anyone can remember, the senior girls have rolled up to the first day of school in style. From the quirky and creative “Senior Girls” tee shirts in colors ranging from  caribbean teal to neon pink, to piercing whistles and colorful boas that leave feathers in the hallways for days, this tradition is one that stands out every year.

In fact, it stands out so much that Helena Knoll ’18 is already looking forward to celebrating her last first day of high school decked out in 2018 spirit. “I am really excited to be a senior in a couple of years and participate in that,” Knoll said. “I also really love how that’s become a tradition year after year.”

While the senior girls’ shirts always look amazing, it takes a lot of creativity and compromise for them to look that good. Many aspects are voted on in the senior girls group, ranging from a clever slogan to the color of the shirt itself. “It was definitely stressful getting everyone to agree,” Emily Phillips ’15 said.

Emma Caplan, also a senior, added that shirt color caused a big divide. “A lot of girls wanted blue shirts and a lot of girls wanted pink.”

How they came to a decision on all of these details? Polls. And lots of them. With deadlines on each poll, the voting process went a lot quicker and smoother. It also assured that everyone’s voice got heard in an organized way. For example, if someone had an idea, they could add it to the poll and watch people vote. “People were allowed to add color shirt choices to the poll,” Caplan said. “That way their opinion could be heard.”

When August 25th arrived though, the polls and endless Facebook notifications were worth it. Caplan even remarked on how all of the drama surrounding the shirts might’ve even brought the girls class of 2015 closer together. “It was really cool seeing all the senior girls on the first day with matching shirts and decorated cars,” Caplan said. “It made us more unified.” While Knoll still has many years until she is proudly clad in her shirt, she has a similar opinion. “The shirts are such a creative way to express your spirit,” she said. “It’s a great way to celebrate that you’ve finally made it to your last year of high school.”

And not only do the car decor, dazzling face paint, feathery boas and bejeweled whistles unify the senior girls as they embark on their final year at Staples, the shirts become a token one can keep forever.

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