Students feel it’s time to turn off the technology

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Students feel it’s time to turn off the technology

Kelsey Shockey, Web Sports Editor

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Let’s face it, if technology just randomly disappeared right now, you wouldn’t know what to do with yourself. People are so dependent on technology that the amount of times someone checks their email, Facebook or Twitter messages in one day is too many to count.

The scary part is that technology will keep advancing and society will never go back to the days of regular communication.

“I do text sometimes during lunch or passing time, although I don’t really do stuff like that in class. I use my iPad to take notes and do research in class a lot. If students use it in class for other purposes, it’s just a matter of being bored in class,” Zack Reiser’14 said.

However, for some students, technology is a thing of the past.

“I chose to use technology less because I just get bored by looking at my phone,” Mike Moritz ’14 said.

No matter where you are in school, there are plenty of students walking down the hall with cell phones in their faces.

“Instead of checking my phone, I’ve become more interested in observing the environment around me, and in doing so, it has made me come to the realization that I was once a slave to my technology,” Moritz said.

Of course, there is no doubt that technology is a huge distraction from school work. Even when technology is not visible, most people still  think in the back of their minds about who may be messaging them.

“To be honest, I don’t really have time for unnecessary distraction. Between school, homework, and sports, I only have an hour or two a day and I like spending that time doing the things I like, such as playing video games. Also, if I’m going to see my friends tomorrow at school, why do I need to talk with them on Facebook?” John Ludy ’15 said.

It’s almost abnormal for someone not to be carrying around any technology, although it can be a burden at times.

“People recognize that I don’t use technology as frequently, but the people who comment on it say that it’s something that can be respected and that it’s a part of me. Technology is stress and if I’m looking at my phone and feel pressured by it, I stop looking at it,” Moritz said.

At the end of the day, it just goes to show that the habit of using your technology can in fact be broken.

Ludy added,“People who rely heavily on technology can’t imagine that a high school student can survive without it, but I am living proof that it’s possible.”

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