Sisters by chance, comedians by choice

Jane Schutte, Breaking News Editor

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The dynamic duo that is Tina Fey and Amy Poehler has always been one of America’s favorite comedy acts, but now with the release of their new movie, Sisters, they have created a film solely dedicated and depictive of their friendship.

Needless to say, it was gut-bustingly amazing.

The plot of the movie is as follows. Two sisters, Fey as the older, Poehler as the younger, decided to have a last hurrah in their childhood home, when they discover their parents have decided to sell it.

“I just moved out of my childhood home,” Jill Gault ’18 said, “and my brother and I did nothing compared to this.”

The party they throw in their home includes hilarious but unfortunate events, that resulted in countless uproars of audience members. Even the elderly woman next to me was crying of laughter as Fey and Poehler performed their secret sister handshake, which to me looked more like a dance bat mitzvah motivators would do.

While everyone is well aware of the two’s clear comedic talent, throughout the movie they were able to incorporate a more serious plot line that made the emotional connection to the characters themselves and to the audience even more touching.

The deep family issues paired with light entertainment left the viewers more able to resonate with the characters, and appreciate the film more as a whole, as no one’s lives are picture perfect.

“In my personal opinion, I feel that the middle aged generation, people my parent’s age for instance, would appreciate the cinema even more than I did,” Bobby Becker ’16 said.

Becker justifies that because the storyline follows two women in their forties trying to act as teenagers, that they would be able to relate more to the humor, as this is something they potentially, but hopefully, would not do.

That is not to say, it would go overlooked by students.

“My siblings and I imitated the nail salon scene for the rest of break,” Eliza Donovan ’16 said, “I won’t spoil the movie for you, but I can tell you it is worth seeing for that scene alone.”

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