New “Cinderella” enchants

 Cinderella premiered March 13 and brings new life to the old fairytale, while still maintaining its charm.

Photo courtesy of MCT Campus.

Cinderella premiered March 13 and brings new life to the old fairytale, while still maintaining its charm.

Greta Bjornson, Features Editor

Cinderella has been recreated countless times: There was the 1997 Brandy version, “Ella Enchanted” with Anne Hathaway, “A Cinderella Story” with Hilary Duff and many other remakes. However, the formula of simplicity seems to work best, as the newest take on “Cinderella” proves.

Director Kenneth Branagh brought the classic fairytale to life with a Cinderella, played by Lily James, with much more personality than the original animated film’s and a few slight changes in the story. Each character had more of his or her history shown, so motivations and actions were supported by the past.

Thankfully, the classics that make the story so charming are faithfully kept in the script. Cinderella’s mice friends make frequent appearances, her fairy godmother expectedly works magic on a pumpkin and Cinderella’s gorgeously impractical glass slippers remain.

Including the iconic slippers, the costumes in the film were beautifully whimsical. Cinderella’s stepsisters burst onto the screen in coordinated colorful prints, while their mother’s 1940’s gowns and accessories oozed power and darkness. Corset controversy aside, Cinderella herself donned a dazzling blue dress embellished with butterflies.

Perhaps the most enjoyable part of the whole film, though, was Lady Tremaine. The icy stepmother was played by a wickedly good Cate Blanchett, whose endless cruelty reduces Cinderella to nothing but a maid for her and her overly idiotic daughters. Blanchett conveyed the jealousy her character harbors with every word she spit out at Cinderella; her scenes easily made the movie.

Although the plot was a little tired at times, “Cinderella” was mostly a joy to watch. The movie is filled with color and effects and has some spectacular scenes. “Cinderella” proves there is nothing wrong with a classic.